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Samuel Adams

 

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01) RIGHTEOUS FOUNDERS: Were the founding fathers of the United States Government righteous men who lived moral and honest lives?

 

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Declaration of Independence

 

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Eminent Spirits Appear to Wilford Woodruff (articles on most of those who appeared)

The Declaration of Independence(includes list of signers with biographical articles)

Samuel Adams

 

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The Declaration of Independence

 

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American War for Independence (1776)

Samuel Adams

 

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Eminent Spirits of Wilford Woodruff

American War for Independence (1776)

Henry Grattan

 

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The Other Eminent Men of Wilford Woodruff

 

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Henry Grattan

 

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Henry Grattan

 

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Eminent Spirits of Wilford Woodruff

John Curran

 

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The Other Eminent Men of Wilford Woodruff

 

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John Curran

 

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John Curran

 

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Eminent Spirits of Wilford Woodruff

John C. Calhoun

 

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The Other Eminent Men of Wilford Woodruff

 

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John C. Calhoun

 

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Eminent Spirits of Wilford Woodruff

Lord Henry Brougham

The most indomitable man of his time Lord Henry Brougham was responsible for making slave-trade a felony and he insured Negro emancipation in all his majesty’s colonies. His efforts on behalf of reform were indefatigable, and his energy never waned throughout his long life. Upon success of the Slave Trade Bill. Brougham turned his energies to the education of the poor. He was instumental in the foundation of the University of London and in establishing the Society of Diffusion of Useful Knowledge.

William Henry Seward

As the great political defenders Henry Clay, John Calhoun, and Daniel Webster neared the end of their lives, many wondered if there would ever again arise such men of destiny. The younger men seemed unlikely candidates, and the public took little note of them. They were nevertheless men of integrity and devotion. Abraham Lincoln was then almost unknown, and William Seward, who was to play a key role as Lincoln’s Secretary of State, was just entering the U.S. Senate.

Richard Cobden

Richard Cobden earned his place in history as an ambassador of good will, advocate for free trade, and enemy to injustice. He is perhaps best known for his work on the repeal of the Corn Law, which opened the way for free trade. Established in 1436, the Corn Law had worked moderately well under the stewardship of Sir Issac Newton. However, by 1815, it had become extremely prohibitive, restricting the importation of grain and keeping domestic prices low. This one law literally strangled the farmers in England as well as the people of Ireland. After seven long years of dedicated work, through his efforts, the Corn law was repealed.

Pablo Benito Juarez

Edmund Burke

Whether or not people are aware of it, Burke was a major contributer to the unchanging fundamentals of sound government. His political preferences were relevant only to his time, but his political principles are timeless. He discerned Diving Guidance in history, and because he was the champion of permanent things, his voice is ageless. Unlike others he is not famous so much for what he did as much as for was he was able to perceive. In an era of revolution Burke was not only a conservator, but a reformer and philosopher as well, These are the elements of Burke’s legacy.

Daniel Webster

As a senator, legislator, and secretary of state, Webster’s greatest triumph was the convincing of the Supreme Court and the people of the United States that the federal government was a union and not a leage. “Liberty and union,” he said, “now and forever, one and inseparable.” Daniel Webster gave all that he had in support of his country, including his son Edward, who died from sickness while serving in the Mexican War, and his only other son, Fletcher, who was killed at the second Battle of Bull Run.