Sylvia Sessions (Lyon)

Sylvia Sessions (Lyon) was a plural wife of the Prophet Joseph Smith.Josephine-Lyons-Fisher-Clark-Layton

Return to Plural Wives of Joseph Smith

Born: July 31, 1818, Andover, Maine

Died: Apr. 12, 1882, Bountiful, Davis County, Utah

Married (Joseph Smith): Nov. 19, 1842 and approx. May 18, 1843

Married (Windsor Lyon): April 21, 1838

Married (Ezekiel Clark):  January 1, 1850, Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa

Full Name: Sylvia Sessions Lyon Clark Smith

Relief Society Minutes

“[Patty [Sessions], interpreting,] said that God was well pleas’d with this [Relief] Society, that if we would be humble and faithful the Lord would pour out upon the members generally the gift of prophecy – that when the speaker laid her hand on the head of Sister Snow, she said that not only she should have the spirit but that all should have it also – that the speaker then address’d herself to mother Smith saying that the prayers of father Smith were now answered upon the members of the Society – that the days of Mother S. should be prolong’d and she should meet many times with the Society, should enjoy much in the society of the sisters & shall hereafter be crown’d a mother of those that shall prove faithful &c.” 1

Josephine R. Fisher, daughter of Sylvia Sessions (Lyon)

“Just prior to my mothers death in 1882 she called me to her bedside and told me that her days on earth were about numbered and before she passed away from mortality she desired to tell me something which she had kept as an entire secret from me and from all the others but which she now desired to communicate to me. She then told me that I was the daughter of the Prophet Joseph Smith, she having been sealed to the Prophet at the time that her husband Mr. Lyon was out of fellowship with the Church.” 2

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube

Notes:

  1. April 19, 1842, Relief Society Minutes, pp. 32-33
  2. Josephine R Fisher, affidavit, 24 February 1915, LDS Archives. Also in: Wells, Emmeline, “Patty Sessions,” Women’s Exponent, v. 13, September 1, 1884, p. 95

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *